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5 Warm Up Techniques Every Voiceover Artist Needs to Know

If you're a voiceover artist, then you know the importance of warming up your voice before a session. Not only does warming up help to prevent injury, but it also helps you to sound your best when recording. In this blog post, we will discuss five warm up techniques that every voiceover artist should know. These exercises will help to loosen up your vocal cords and get you ready for your next session!


The first warm up technique is to hum. You can do this with or without a pitch pipe. Simply hum a note and hold it for as long as you can. This will help to loosen up your vocal cords and get them ready for singing.


The second warm up technique is to do some lip trills. To do this, simply make an "o" shape with your mouth and then vibrate your lips while making an "e" sound. This exercise will help to stretch out your vocal cords and get them ready for speaking or singing.


The third warm up technique is to gargle with water. This will help to lubricate your vocal cords and prevent them from drying out during your session. Be sure to use room temperature water so that you don't shock your system.


The fourth warm up technique is to do some tongue twisters. This will help to get your articulators moving and improve your diction. Some popular tongue twisters include: "She sells seashells by the seashore," "How can a clam cram in a clean cream can?" and "I saw Susie sitting in a shoeshine shop."


The fifth and final warm up technique is to sing a scale. You can do this with or without a pitch pipe. Simply start at the bottom of your range and work your way up to the top, hitting each note in between. This will help to stretch out your vocal cords and get them ready for singing.


So there you have it, five warm up techniques that every voiceover artist should know. Be sure to try these exercises before your next session to help you sound your best!


Do you have a favorite warm up technique? Let us know in the comments below!

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